No news isn’t always good news

Time for an update about my health in general. Many of you have reached out to ask how I’m doing, some of you have told me you’ve been wondering but haven’t wanted to ask. I’ve received so many messages that I haven’t respond to most of them. I’m very grateful for the care.

Unfortunately there isn’t any more news from the testing done while I was in hospital last month. I’m on oxygen due to shortness of breath, and we don’t know how to treat whatever is causing the shortness of breath. The hospital tests ruled out major things like cancer, heart issues, fluid build-up, blood clots, several infections. We ended up with an uncomfortable mystery.

Obviously breathing really matters, and not knowing why a person’s blood oxygen level dips so low is not good news. We would really like there to be better news to share with you, but right now, sadly, there isn’t.

So for now we will hold onto hope and stay the course with the current treatment while looking into other possible treatment options in case this may be caused by cancer growth (which it might be, though the scans do not clearly show this). There are no clinical trials that we know of that could be a good fit for someone in my situation right now. (If you are in Canada and looking for a clinical trial that might be a good fit for you, you can connect with the Clinical Trials Navigator who is there to help you! Canadian Cancer Clinical Trials Navigator: https://3ctn.ca/for-patients/clinical-trials-nav/ )

Since starting on chemotherapy in 2020, each scan has led us to believe that the cancer is either stable or smaller. We continue to believe that the current treatment is effectively slowing the cancer’s growth (even if not fully abolishing it), so it’s definitely better to continue than to stop. We will go ahead with chemotherapy number 23 tomorrow, do more testing (bloodwork to be done on Monday and sent to Canexia in Vancouver BC Canada), and hold onto hope.

(One of the ways I hold onto hope is to pray, another is to read the Bible, another is to listen to wise friends.)

Fellow lung cancer survivor Taylor and I plan to connect tomorrow morning. (We met in person last chemo and get chemo on the same three-week cycle at The Ottawa Hospital.) I’ll go in a little early to get to see him and give him a white ribbon www.thewhiteribbonproject.org . The White Ribbon Project connects people affected by lung cancer worldwide, and is helping to draw people into community locally also. The power of the white ribbon. How good is that!

You may have noticed I’ve been a little less visible on social media in recent weeks. Yesterday after the port insertion I missed out on uplifting and honouring amazing women for International Women’s Day #IWD2022.

Honouring and uplifting people is good to do every day. Since I didn’t yesterday, today I’m sending out a big general cheer for the women who do tremendous work in the cancer advocacy landscape (too many to name individually, so I’ll name some of the organizations where we may have worked as teammates together): CCTG, 3CTN, OICR, CCS, IASLC, ILCF, LCC, SU2C, LHF, CCSN, CAPO, IPOS, CADTH, TOH, CCMB, PMH, CIHR, LUNGevity, GO2, LuCE, ALK+, AACR, ASCO, … (+ numerous other advocates who have inspired outside of these organizations). What a list! If you are an advocate and there is a way I might help you connect with some amazing teammates in any of these organizations, please feel free to ask. Connecting and uplifting people is a passion. #team

In the pictures above are just a few of the amazing women (and some men) who have inspired many of us. (These are pictures I could quickly find and put on my blog tonight.) So many are not pictured above, and there are very many more to come!

#hope

Port Insertion Update

Quite a few people have asked about the port, so it’s probably time for an update.

First, there are no substantial health updates. I continue to be very thankful for and doing well on oxygen while waiting for test results.

The port insertion was initially scheduled to take place last month, but was cancelled because I was in hospital. Good news is that my hard-working oncologist put in another request and now it’s rescheduled for next week!

The procedure takes about three hours, and no food or drink is allowed from midnight the night before. The mother of one of my dear friends from high school is generously driving me to and from the appointment.

People keep saying how much easier the port made things for them, so having the port definitely sounds like a good choice. I’m a little nervous about the actual procedure, so would welcome prayers and good thoughts for Tuesday morning, March 8th.