Sharing Hope

An encouraging email from a dear friend this morning reminded me that if you don’t follow me on facebook, you may not know how grateful I am for your generous flow of donations which filled my LUNGevity Summit Survivor Challenge account all the way to the top and even a little bit over! I am excited to be going to LUNGevity Foundation’s International Lung Cancer Survivorship Conference in Washington, DC, April 26-28!! THANK YOU!!!

I am grateful to be blessed in so many ways, and one of the biggest gifts is my community, my circle of friends who hold me with such love. Thank you for being part of that community. I have no words for how grateful I am for you.

Yesterday my husband bumped into a teacher from back in our eldest’s elementary school days. She told him she follows this blog and prays for me every night. When he told me, I got a little teary with gratitude. I can’t tell you how many times people have said they read this blog and think of me and/or pray for me regularly. Thank you! You are making a difference!

You help me have hope! Thank you!

As my dear friend said in her email, I have opportunity to share amazing hope… here in Ottawa, in Atlanta the end of this month, at the LUNGevity conference in April, and who knows where else! Thank you for the ways you help me open up the doors!

This is Hope!

LUNGevity’s summits have made a huge difference for me. I’ve deeply connected with my lung cancer family, my silver linings. I’ve learned about new research, and my hope has grown tremendously.

Being at this conference has been incredibly inspiring, and I would love to go again this year. I want to be there to represent Canada, and be a supportive presence for all who are there. I also want to get a booster shot of hope and bring back news of exciting research and great stories to share with Canadians (and others) affected by lung cancer. I know I’d come back a better advocate.

If I can raise $1500 or more in donations, LUNGevity will cover my travel expenses, including airfare and hotel accommodations.

Many of you were so generous for the Super Bowl Challenge, and I’m thankful! I wouldn’t want anyone to feel pressure, but if you’re able to help me get to this year’s summit, I’d be grateful.

Here’s the link:Jill’s LUNGevity Summit Fundraising Page

Deadline is March 15!

LUNGevity earned a 4-star rating (the highest rating) from Charity Navigator again this year. You can read more about that here.

Two of my Ottawa lung cancer sisters are coming to the summit this year, maybe more! Others are coming from elsewhere in Canada. It would be strategic, and so good to spend time with them!

LUNGevity’s summits have been getting growing numbers of people affected by lung cancer from around the world, so this year it’s “The International Lung Cancer Survivorship Conference”. I’m going to represent Canada and I look forward to spending time there with some of the Canadian lung cancer advocates that I try to encourage regularly.

Click here for Jill’s LUNGevity Summit Fundraising Page

Proceeds from this fundraiser will benefit LUNGevity Foundation, the leading private provider of research funding for lung cancer. LUNGevity Foundation is firmly committed to making an immediate impact on increasing quality of life and survivorship of people with lung cancer by accelerating research into early detection and more effective treatments, as well as providing community, support, and education for all those affected by the disease.

Thank you!

I’m so grateful that I could join about 200 Lung Cancer survivors and 170 caregivers at LUNGevity’s Hope Summit in Washington DC the end of April!

I arrived to cherry blossoms on Thursday afternoon and enjoyed a quick view of some of the monuments and museums from the Circulator Bus. I spent time in the National Museum of African American History & Culture. I’m grateful for the few hours I got to play tourist, the many steps I walked (about three times my usual), and the healthy food I was able to buy from a grocery store. I went to my room early and slept well in preparation for the packed schedule the next three days!

Friday was a special Advocates day, thenย a welcome reception to kick off the week-end.ย We listened to speakers, met amazing new friends and reconnected with dear folks who feel like family!

So much exciting new research! So much joy and love, tears and hugs. So much hope!

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Jill & Jill ย # This Is Hope

I came home refreshed and renewed, encouraged and energized! I came home with inspiration, instruction and ideas! I came home with deep gratitude for the people who make this Hope Summit what it is: organizers, speakers, participants, and generous supporters like many of you!

Thank you for helping me go! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

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Linnea has the same type of LC as I do, and is celebrating 13 years of living life since diagnosis!

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Canadians are loved, welcomed, and (this year) honoured with a special ribbon on our name tags. (I chose the purple one for fun!)

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Two of us came from Ottawa! So exciting! ๐Ÿ™‚

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Five Canadians participated this year! Four of us are pictured here with LUNGevity’s inimitable Katie Brown! How many Canadians will go in 2019?

 

 

“You’re not alone”

Having “the conversation” with people you love is one of the hardest things after a cancer diagnosis. Three and a half years later, I clearly recall some details of those painful conversations when I told my friends or family that I had cancer – serious cancer.

The anticipation was horrible. The conversations were difficult, but there were many moments of love and generosity outpoured, both during the conversation as well as afterwards. So much grace that I had not anticipated!

I remember telling my small group. Our group has met weekly for several years to study the Bible and pray together. We had grown to love and trust each other, and these were friends I knew I could lean on. I knew they would be there for me, but I had no idea how much.

“You’re not alone.” The first words I remember hearing from my small group when I told them my sad news. Many more words of love, support and solidarity have followed, but these words echo out across the years. These words echo when my friends pass the tissues and cry with me, when they gather around and pray for me, when they bring me food and organize an army of beautifully generous meal preparers, when they get on hands and knees to clean my house, when they sit with me and listen, when they take my kids out for treats and listen, when they have our family over for an evening of fun, …

It’s not good to be alone. We need each other. We need people to laugh with and cry with. We were made for community.

The gifts that I have received in vulnerable times mean so much, and I am grateful beyond words for the goodness that friends, acquaintances, and even strangers have poured out over us since my diagnosis. God’s presence, faithful love and abundance is always with us – so many passages of Scripture remind us! We have felt embraced by love and generosity … never alone!

Another good gift I have received is the community of lung cancer patients and caregivers. People who’ve had similar conversations with their family and friends. People whose conversations have not always gone well.

I’m grateful for so many of these fine folks I’ve been privileged to get to know online through patient forums. These groups are a good source of support and information for me. I’ve grown to love these people and to think of them as my tribe!

And recently I got to meet some in person through LUNGevity’s Hope Summit in Washington DC.

I left Ottawa one cold and foggy morning in April and arrived in a completely different climate zone. Spring had sprung in DC. I had already missed the cherry blossom festival, but there remained much beauty to behold!

The Patients’ & Caregivers’ Summits began on Friday night, with an Advocates meeting for a number of us keeners on Friday. I arrived on Thursday morning with the whole day stretched out before me. I hadn’t ever met anyone from LUNGevity before, and I was a bit nervous about being there all by myself. I checked into the hotel, right by the beautiful Key Bridge (which crosses the Potomac from Rosslyn Virginia into Georgetown). I was just about to head out the door to find my way to some of the Monuments and Museums in DC, but got distracted by people arriving in the lobby.

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View of the beautiful Key Bridge & Georgetown from the top floor of the hotel

I couldn’t help but overhear one of the conversations … it sounded vaguely like it could be between two LUNGevity friends who hadn’t seen each other since last year’s Patient Summit! I approached and asked if by any chance they were part of LUNGevity, and that is how I met my first two LUNGevity friends, Ivy and Don! They were so friendly and invited me to join them and others for a walk across the Key Bridge to Georgetown for lunch! It was pretty easy to choose getting to know them over sight-seeing!

I never did make it to any museums or monuments, but I have no regrets! I was privileged to spend a lot of time meeting new friends and walking back and forth multiple times across that bridge! No one was left behind … not even people with diminished lung capacity! ๐Ÿ˜‰

I learned more about advocacy and what it means to be an advocate or an activist. Thought-provoking! So many good conversations both as part of the summit and in the unscheduled moments!

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Chris Draft of the Draft Family Foundation: Inspiring Advocate!

So many exciting new advances in Lung Cancer treatments! So many resources! So much reason for hope!

One of the presenters was Dr. Ross Camidge, a well-known expert in my particular type of lung cancer. Late Saturday afternoon I sat beside him at an “Ask the Expert” table discussion. So many questions I could have asked him, but my brain was chock-full of information so we mostly chatted about cross-cultural differences (he’s from the UK and works at the University of Colorado Cancer Center), and he told me funny stories! ๐Ÿ™‚

I came away encouraged and inspired! I came home with ideas and direction! I’m so grateful for all the LUNGevity folks who welcomed me, and for the anonymous donor who made it possible for me to be there. Thank you!

But mostly I came away with a strong sense that I am not alone! There are so many others walking similar paths, and I am grateful for the opportunity to get to know some more of my tribe! I’m grateful to be able to walk across that beautiful bridge! I’m grateful to have met these beautiful people who are walking a similar journey to me – patients and caregivers and others who support and advocate powerfully!

I hope to tell you more in future posts. There is always so much to say! ๐Ÿ™‚

Here’s some exciting news about next week: I’m participating in a webinar for Cancer Coaches on Monday afternoon, speaking about my clinical trial experience. This is my first webinar, and I’m grateful for this opportunity! Cancer coaches are a real gift, and they can help you with difficult conversations!