Happy World Cancer Research Day!

Biomarker Testing + Research + Access = Life

I’m alive today because of biomarker testing, research, and access to new treatment options. Yes, and great care from my oncologist, Dr. Garth Nicholas, and healthcare team at The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre.

I was diagnosed with stage 4 ALK+ lung cancer in 2013 when my children were only 6, 10 and 12.

I started on chemo, then four different targeted therapies … Most treatment lines lasted only a year or two; each gift of time meant more life, more time with family and friends, more opportunities to serve as a lung cancer advocate

Every month, every year has meant memories and milestones, opportunities to celebrate life and be with my kids as they have grown. 

My youngest was just about to start grade one when I had a cold with a cough that wouldn’t go away which was eventually diagnosed as lung cancer. Now she is in grade 9, just started high school. My middle child can play almost every musical instrument and will graduate high school this year. My oldest, who was in grade 7 when I was diagnosed, is now in third year university, studying Electrical Engineering and Physics.

I can’t tell you how thankful I am to still be with them. Very thankful for biomarker testing, research and access to new treatments… and my terrific healthcare team.

Targeted therapy is such a game changer. New targeted treatments are so much better than chemotherapy – it’s a night and day difference – and these new treatments keep getting better and better!

Targeted therapy means more energy, more good days, more ability, more time for the people we love, more time for what matters, more life.

My children are my top priority. I am also passionate about lung cancer advocacy. I started on Lorlatinib in 2018, and it has given me great quality of life, so I have been able to invest about 30-40 hours a week in lung cancer advocacy.

This is an excerpt from a presentation I’ve been making (as part of a team) to a number of groups this month. Next come many slides with pictures and quotes from people affected by lung cancer, people who I love, who are like family to me. They are living life more fully, because they have access to new life-extending treatments called targeted therapies. These are people who matter and are worth fighting for. I’m honoured to “bring them with me” as part of these presentations, and appreciate very much their willingness to share pictures and stories with the goal of increasing access to new drugs.

The presentation is about the importance of fighting for people to get access for new targeted therapies, because this is a matter of life and death and people matter. Research alone isn’t enough. We need to enlarge the boundaries of our concept of research to also include biomarker testing and access.

What are new drugs worth if we don’t do biomarker testing to find out which people will likely benefit from the new treatment? With 100% biomarker testing we will know specifically which type of cancer more people have, and be able to match more people with effective treatments. With 100% biomarker testing, we will also be able to more quickly accrue more patients to our clinical trials so the trials will show results more quickly, and effective new treatments can get approved and funded sooner.

What is the value of researchers working hard to develop effective new treatments, if people cannot get access to them? Access matters. It is often a matter of life and death. We must work to close the gaps and make sure people can benefit from research. Could you imagine how hard it would be to be a dying cancer patient who knows there is an effective treatment that would very likely extend their life, but they can’t get access to it? How hard would it be to be the patient’s loved one? The patient’s oncologist?

Biomarker Testing + Research + Access = Life

On this World Cancer Research Day, let’s celebrate research and researchers! Let’s celebrate fundraisers, administrators and patient partners! Let’s celebrate the entire research team! Let’s broaden our concept of research and fight together for more people to benefit from effective new research.

#BiomarkerTestingMatters #ResearchMatters #AccessMatters

#Hope #ResearchWorks #WorldCancerResearchDay #PeopleMatter

(Note: photo above is Dr. Vicky Forster, Toronto; photo’s are all pre-COVID.)

Scan results

Scanxiety is real… the anxiety many of us can feel around scan time. Most who’ve been diagnosed with lung cancer are on treatment, whether it’s a targeted therapy in pill form, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or a new kind of therapy devised by researchers to keep us living longer and better. Whether alone or in combination, most are on treatment and get regularly scheduled scans to see if the treatment is working.

Sometimes some get cues that the cancer may be growing or shrinking, side effects that may be indicators, that might give an idea of what is happening inside our body. Often it’s a mystery. Lung cancer can be sneaky.

My 13th round of chemo was on Thursday August 12. I also continue to take a daily targeted therapy, Lorlatinib. This combination has growing popularity with some of the top lung cancer doctors in the US. I’m thankful to be able to have access to both treatments here. Lorlatinib is very effective at keeping the cancer from spreading to the brain. My CT scan was Monday morning (the 23rd), and results just came in: all is stable or slightly better! Such great news when someone gets good scans!

In the past few months, Several dear friends have gone through progression and questions about what kind of treatment path to take forward. Some have faced serious health challenges. These can be scary times. So grateful every time there is good news. We keep holding onto hope for more research to bring more treatment options which will help further extend life. Often there is uncertainty, and it can look like the research may not be keeping up with the need. And then there’s the issue of access: what about people who cannot use a treatment because they can’t get it? Maybe it’s too expensive or not available where they live or when they need it?

Lorlatinib is a drug that has helped keep me alive and living very well for years. I’m very grateful for it and have been working with others for some time to get better access to Lorlatinib for more Canadians. I’m thankful for the compassionate release program from Pfizer which has meant that every month a package of life-extending medicine, probably worth over $10,000/month, is delivered to the door at no charge. This morning, a cheery FedEx employee handed over the small box with a lovely greeting. He had no idea how thankful I am for that delivery.

Very grateful to continue to receive free Lorlatinib and that scans are good. Very thankful for researchers, clinical trials opening space, terrific care teams, dedicated advocates, and hope. It’s so important to hold onto hope.

(Apologies for the older photo’s. My phone is not currently working.)

Fundraising continues!

The Super Bowl Challenge is over, but the fundraising continues! It’s not too late to give to support people affected by lung cancer! Please note Team Jill’s new Canadian page 2020 link: http://donate.ottawacancer.ca/goto/teamjill

Going to the Super Bowl is the cherry on top of the real prize which is really about raising money and challenging our communities to stand up for people affected by lung cancer. The Super Bowl Challenge is over but the fundraising is not!

I’m here, alive more than 6 years after diagnosis. The lung cancer is controlled by one pill each day. We’re not ready to call this a chronic disease like diabetes, but for people with a diagnosis like mine, the median survival is 6.8 years. Those 6 years mean a lot. My kids have gone from being 6, 10 and 12 at time of diagnosis, to now being all teenagers. What a privilege, what a gift to be here with them! These 6 years mean a LOT!

Research matters! Research means more people with lung cancer will live longer. It is imperative that research is ongoing, and also that everyone diagnosed with lung cancer in Canada gets access to the best treatments available. That means biomarker testing and faster approval of effective treatments. Clinical trials give people access to new effective treatments.

It’s a shame we weren’t able to raise more money and create more access to treatments. We are continuing to work on opening up pathways: it shouldn’t be so hard to give money for lung cancer research!

Team Jill’s Canadian page has been migrated to its brand new 2020 link! Since that’s ready, Team Jill will be fundraising more actively again until the Feb. 3 deadline!

Once we raise $5000USD, 90% of the total raised will go to Ottawa lung cancer clinical trials. The other 10% will go to Team Draft’s excellent lung cancer initiatives.

Chris Draft gives tremendous support and leadership to lung cancer survivors and advocates around the world. He has made a strategic difference here in Ottawa, connecting with Louise and the Evening of Hope Team, Elizabeth Dessureault and her family, Kayla and Jordan MacWilliam and their community, and many more. We are grateful for him and his wisdom and encouragement.

Team Jill:  https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/2020-lung-cancer-survivors-super-bowl-challenge/jillhamer-wilson

OR: Team Jill’s 2020 Canadian page (for Canadian Income Tax receipts):  http://donate.ottawacancer.ca/goto/teamjill

3 French Hens: Support Groups

12 Days of Giving to Lung Cancer Clinical Trials

All it takes is two. Put two lung cancer survivors together and anything could happen! Get three together and it could be a support group!

There’s nothing like meeting someone you really connect with! It has happened time and time again, the spark, the recognition that someone else gets it, they understand your experience, and they care.

Two survivors together is powerful. There is strength in numbers, and two is enough. Get three and now we’re really cooking! There is no telling what could happen!

Two survivors plus a social worker or psychologist, or any third who is willing to lead, and all kinds of good could come of that. Just ask Alyson and Christine about what happened in Winnipeg less than a year ago. The lung cancer support group they started in Spring of 2019 stood up and clapped with gratitude for them. They just celebrated the holidays with a party this week! What a difference this support group is making! Way to go, Alyson, Christine, Mike, Kelly and team!

It may seem hard to start a support group, but it’s not too hard. People do it all the time. Support groups are best practices and they do good for people around the world. It’s not too hard to start one. There are courses in leading groups, lots of books, experienced leaders, and other resources to learn from. Right in cancer centres all over the world, there are loads of trained, caring people working in psychosocial oncology. It’s not too late to learn. Alyson and Christine asked a lot of questions when they were getting started, and a social worker here in Ottawa helped them connect with teammates in Winnipeg. Reach out! Ask questions! Support groups are best practices, and lots of people could benefit if we had more of them.

We’re very grateful for the lung cancer support group in Ottawa. It was started (in October 2017) by Social Worker Diane Manii and a team here in Ottawa, with Lung Cancer Canada and the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation. It continues with their support and the support of The Ottawa Hospital. There is much generosity toward the Ottawa support group, and strong support within the group. The group has also started reaching out at the Cancer Centre with monthly hope tables (since August 2018) which are greatly appreciated. The group participated in Ottawa Race Weekend (#LungCancerStrong) in May 2019, raising funds as “Lung Cancer Team Canada” for Lung Cancer Canada, and growing numbers are participating in political advocacy for lung cancer.

I’m very grateful for the women and men I’ve met through our Ottawa support group. They are silver linings of lung cancer.

If you don’t have a support group and you would like to explore starting one, please start looking around and asking questions. You may be in an area where it may not look like there are enough people or resources for a lung cancer specific group, but don’t let that discourage you. People are willing to help; reach out!

Once you have three, there’s no telling what you can do!

To celebrate support groups and survivorship, please give generously to lung cancer research!

Team Jill:  https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/2020-lung-cancer-survivors-super-bowl-challenge/jillhamer-wilson

OR: Team Jill’s Canadian page (for Canadian Income Tax receipts): http://donate.ottawacancer.ca/goto/jill 

#12Days of giving to #lungcancer #clinicaltrials #Hope #Care #Team #Support #SilverLinings #ThankYou

1 Partridge in a Pear Tree

12 Days of Giving to Lung Cancer Clinical Trials

Clinical trials mean life for people with lung cancer. They not only make a difference for people in the future. Clinical trials extend lives right now. Clinical trials matter!

Hope Matters. We all need hope, especially in hard times. Everyone goes through them, and in the midst of the darkness, hope is an act of defiance.

In Spring 2015, my health was bad. After a year and a half of first chemo then targeted therapy, I was weak and concerned that there might not be any more treatment options for me. My kids were 8, 11 and 14.

We were incredibly thankful for the clinical trial that my oncologist told me about. It brought hope, and I eagerly signed up. I wrote about it at the time, and here in An Act of Defiance, where I told the story of asking my family to plant an apple tree for me for my birthday in the Spring of 2015. The pear tree immediately brought to mind this story of hope.

Apple trees take years to bear fruit. Would I live to see it? Only one way to find out! Fast forward to 2019: we have harvested loads of apples and are very thankful I’m alive to enjoy them. Choose hope!

Hope is an act of defiance! When times are tough we can run low on hope. Hope matters. We need to nurture the hope within us, and when running low on hope, ask for help! #HopeMatters

That clinical trial kept me alive for over a year and a half, long enough for new and better treatment options to become available. I’m on my second treatment line since that clinical trial. I’m alive (and so very thankful) today because of grace and that clinical trial.

Research works. It is working to help give more and more people longer and better survivorship! Lung cancer research matters because people matter.

Four and a half years later I am filled with gratitude for that clinical trial and all who funded it, giving me the gift of extra years of life, such important years that I’ve cherished with my family and friends. My kids are now 12, 16 and 18. We’re incredibly grateful for these years.

Four and a half years later I know from the depth of my being that research matters. Four and a half years later I keep shouting from the rooftops: RESEARCH MATTERS!

I’m raising funds this month, posting these 12 days of giving to lung cancer clinical trials. Please give generously: your gift could mean years of life for someone like me, and what a difference that makes for so many!

To celebrate SiX years of lung cancer survivorship, please give generously to lung cancer research!

Team Jill:  https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/2020-lung-cancer-survivors-super-bowl-challenge/jillhamer-wilson

OR: Team Jill’s Canadian page (for Canadian Income Tax receipts): http://donate.ottawacancer.ca/goto/jill

#12Days of giving to #lungcancer #clinicaltrials #HopeMatters #appletree #peartree #HopeisanActofDefiance #ChooseHope #Hope

In the Bleak Midwinter

First of all, dear friends, let me remind you that January is radon month, so if you haven’t checked your home for radon, please do it this week-end! Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Please protect yourself and your loved ones by getting a test kit this week-end and using it! You can read more in my previous blog post: How Two Trips to the Basement Could Save Your Life. Thus ends my radon public service announcement! 🙂

You’re probably wondering what I’ve been up to lately, besides hanging out with my boys and walking the dog. The answer is LOTS!

The Ottawa support group is going well: 13 out at our January meeting. We have an awareness day planned at the General next Thursday. Drop by the Cancer Centre and say hello if you’re around!

Our December Ottawa support group party, with a delicious and generously catered meal from Chances R Restaurant

I’m working at collecting and connecting lung cancer patients across the country, so if you know of any, please send them in my direction! Today I was talking with dear folks in Winnipeg. Yesterday it was Calgary. It can be pretty lonely here in Canada, without other lung cancer friends around! That’s why I’m working to find and connect lung cancer patients in various geographic regions across this large land. I hope we will have patient support groups, awareness days and summits across the country!

There aren’t enough hours in the day! I love serving as a catalyst, a creative problem solver! I’m energized by this work, and eager to meet people, gather them together, and help build lung cancer communities.

I joined the Canadian Cancer Trials Group as (volunteer) patient representative, Lung Site, in November. The CCTG develops and conducts clinical trials, and includes all major cancer centres and many community hospitals across the country. This will afford me the opportunity to meet people doing lung cancer research across the country, and that should help with my community building work! As patient representative, I have opportunities to give input into the clinical trial process at many points along the way. Steep learning curve and big responsibility! It’s important that I get to know a wide variety of lung cancer patients so that I can fulfill my obligation to represent us all. I hope to listen and learn a lot in the coming months and hopefully years. I hope to live long enough to fulfill my three year term commitment. Perhaps another clinical trial will help extend my life once again!

I’ve also applied to the Scientist-Survivor program at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting this Spring in Atlanta. What a wonderful opportunity to meet researchers, advocates, oncologists and learn many things about research into all kinds of cancer, then pass my learning along to many others! I should hear any day if I’ve been accepted, and I am eagerly hoping!

Christmas Day 2018

But it’s not all lung cancer around here. Sadly, Jono’s Mum is extremely unwell. Jono and our youngest rushed off to Australia right after Christmas to be with her and the rest of Jono’s family. We wished we all could have gone. They shared many joyous times together in the midst of such sorrow, and have just returned home. We’d be grateful if you could spare a prayer or warm thought for the family as it seems the end is drawing near.

Real Live Superheroes

This morning something pretty awesome happened. I got to enter a room filled with superheroes! These are amazing superheroes who do their superhero work all day long, cleverly disguised as ordinary people.

I was asked to show up at 9:00 am on the first Wednesday in July to meet the person who would escort me to a secret location. Thankfully no blindfold was needed, no large sack thrown over my head.

As we reached our destination, the door opened and I recognized many of the people inside. There were nurses, administrators, researchers … a whole team of people dedicated to cancer research at The Ottawa Hospital!

This was a meeting of The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre’s Clinical Trials Superheroes (not their official name!), and I’d been invited to share my story with them!

About a month ago their team leader contacted me. She’d heard me speak at the big fundraising breakfast for the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation in May, and she wanted to connect with me.

I was excited to meet her, not only because I was curious to see what she had in mind, but also because I’ve been trying to understand the Lung Cancer landscape in Canada and had loads of questions about research. She answered many of my questions and then set up another meeting so I could learn even more.

As I got to know this inspiring team leader, I quickly realized she is amazing! She wakes up early in the morning to come up with new and better ideas for how she and her team can do their superhero work.

They strike me as a humble group. You won’t typically see them in their superhero costumes. They work hard day in and day out, many of them behind the scenes, caring for cancer patients and helping to develop better treatments for us. And I was given the privilege of telling them my story, how a clinical trial – THEIR CLINICAL TRIAL – saved my life.

A little over three years ago, I had run out of treatment options. I was coughing non-stop, weak, unwell. It looked like cancer was gaining the upper hand. Then the clinical trial. Everything changed. Three years later here I am!

A clinical trial at The Ottawa Hospital changed our family’s story! A new investigational drug extended my life two years: long enough for another drug to be ready when I needed it! In this way, that clinical trial is still at work, continuing to extend my life. Four and a half years after diagnosis, I’m still on treatment, still going strong and still so very thankful!

Of course, many of them already knew my story – at least bits and pieces of it – because many of them have played significant roles in it. In this room were people who filled out paperwork for me to enter the clinical trial, listened to me and listed all my many side effects, and did all the ongoing work (like booking scans and more paperwork) to keep me in the trial. There were nurses who extended kindness as they interacted with me, drew blood and ran tests. I went into the hospital at least twice every three weeks for almost two years, and I received excellent care.

Not only do they provide excellent professional care, but these superheroes actually do care. I’ve seen them go out of their way, above and beyond, to take care of people, and I know that is why they do their job.

These superheroes, cleverly disguised as ordinary members of the cancer centre’s clinical trials team, save people’s lives on a regular basis!

It was such an honour to be in the room with them. I’m grateful for the opportunity to thank them for their hard work and the difference they have made for me and my family. So many memories these past three years, so many milestones our family has been able to share. Because of the grace of God and because of superheroes like this awesome team!

Here is a picture of some of them right after I spoke this morning … and if you look very closely, you might even catch a glimpse of one of their superhero capes!

IMG_20180704_092505580.jpg

 

An Act of Defiance

Three years ago I committed an act of rebellion way beyond anything I had done in my teens.

I didn’t do it alone: I recruited my family in this ridiculously defiant act.

I was diagnosed with lung cancer in December 2013. At that time, there were two treatment options for my particular kind of lung cancer: IV chemo and a new targeted therapy (pills) called Crizotinib. I underwent IV chemotherapy and then I took the brand new targeted therapy, but one and a half years after my diagnosis, I had run out of options. In May 2015, the cancer was growing and there were no more approved treatments.

Thankfully, my oncologist did his research and learned there was a clinical trial that I might qualify for. This clinical trial was for another new targeted therapy called Ceritinib. I underwent lots of testing to find out if I would be allowed to join.

My friends prayed as I went through the process. We had no idea if I would qualify, nor which arm of the trial would be the best one for me. I was approved and randomly chosen for the group that we now know is now best practice for this drug. All over the world now, people take Ceritinib with a low calorie, low fat breakfast, exactly as I did throughout that clinical trial.

I kept taking Ceritinib as long as it worked: almost two years! The side effects were difficult but bearable. That clinical trial extended my life – not just for those two years, but it also carried me through long enough for new treatment options to be available. Now I’m on a third targeted therapy, and it has been working well for a year and a half. We give thanks!

But three years ago, I had just started this clinical trial and I had all kinds of side effects. They tend to be worse the first few weeks of a new treatment, and I was also dealing with side effects from recently stopping the previous treatment. It was a very difficult season, I was in excruciating pain, and we had no idea if the clinical trial would work.

So in the midst of all the uncertainty and pain and grief, I decided to take a drastic step.

It had to do with an apple tree. I’m a bit of a gardener (not so much in recent years). For years, I thought about planting an apple tree but never did because it takes a few years to bear fruit, and I preferred plants that would give more immediate results. I did not want to wait for an apple tree to mature enough to bear fruit.

Three years ago, I chose to incite rebellion. I chose defiance.

Shortly after I started that clinical trial, my birthday was approaching. For my birthday I told my family the only present I wanted was for them to give me an apple tree and plant it in our back yard. A special tree, with branches of different kinds of apple trees grafted on so that we could have a variety of apples to enjoy. A tree of hope.

Hope is an act of defiance.

I started a rebellion and provoked defiant hope.

And it paid off: as I celebrate my birthday three years later, that tree is fruiting in a spectacular manner!

Three years later, more treatments are approved and available, and many more are in the pipeline for my kind of lung cancer and for other kinds too.

Three years later, there are baskets full of hope that were empty before.

There’s still a long way to go, though. I’m grateful that I’m here and I have a voice to speak up for lung cancer patients and all cancer patients.

This kind of defiant hope compels me as I seek to improve outcomes for lung cancer patients. I have so much to learn! I want to strategically invest my limited energy! Lung cancer has been neglected for too many years, and I’m looking for ways to change this.

It takes hope to plant a seed. It seems ridiculous that a small dead-looking seed will come to anything, but we know it can. We’ve seen it time and again: we eat food every day.

I’m planting my seed! I hope my small efforts will make a big difference for many of us.

Hope gathers us. Hope unites us. Hope holds us.

Hope is an act of defiance. Come join the rebellion!

Good News and Good Gifts

Here’s a bit of good news that made me cheer yesterday morning:

My regular clinical trial protocol has changed! So, instead of going in to the hospital two days in a row every three weeks, I’ll now have all my appointments on the same day – yay! It will be one long day, but only one day and I’m pretty sure it will be less tiring overall!

To celebrate, I slept in this morning! My 8:30 am appointment was cancelled because I did all my tests and meetings yesterday! I feel tired today, but not as tired as I typically do on the second appointment day!

Yesterday at the hospital, I rejoiced again to receive comments about how thick my file is and how many weeks I’ve been on this trial. I’m very thankful that these meds continue to work for me! I’m grateful that I get to keep taking them, and hopeful that the good work they are doing will continue for a very long time!

In other exciting news, my kids have been away at camp (a great opportunity for which we are deeply grateful!), and they’re coming home soon! I wrote a poem this year which I will have posted below. (Sorry about the formatting: not exactly what I wanted, but it’ll do!)

I hope you will enjoy the rest of the Summer (or Winter, for those in the Southern Hemisphere), and give thanks for the gifts of each day! Our doorbell just rang, announcing the good gift of a dear friend visiting and presenting me with a gorgeous shirt she just made for me! I’m feeling rather bowled over by this generous gift! I am grateful for so many gifts, including your ongoing prayers and encouragement! Thank you!

Heart Pressed

They bump out the door,

Duffle bags bulging with sleeping bags and swimsuits,

Enough for fourteen fun packed days

The door bangs behind them,

Its vacuum pulling my heart along with them, 

Pressed up against the glass,

Aching for their presence

Yearning for their laughter

Echoing around these now empty rooms

And they’re off!

Bundled into the car

Bright smiles, cheerful waves and calls of, “I love you!” “xoxoxoxo!”

Last year, she said, she blew me kisses all the way down our street, down the next one and the one after that, and even along the highway …

Our love is a bungie cord

It stretches and stretches and

Will not break

My heart squeezes out through the door and sneaks into the car with them,

Travelling that 400km journey, tucked away like the messages I hide in their bags,

Like my note she keeps safe under her pillow at camp

And I remain, heart pressed against the glass,

Aching for them to deeply know the One who will never leave nor forsake them,

Yearning for them to encounter Him in bigger and truer ways,

Trusting that as they grow, He is always more than enough.

Heart eagerly pressed against the glass,

Excited about the people they will meet, skills they will learn, songs they will sing, stories they will savour, beauty they will behold …

And bundle up to bring back home to me

IMG_6567.jpg

A sample of our summer adventures:

(Diefenbunker, Nature Museum, History Museum)

IMG_6444

My firstborn, serving his delicious homemade ice cream!

Fundraiser: an inside look

They say the vast majority of people are so afraid of public speaking that they would rather die than give a speech. I’m certainly not in that category! Yesterday I spoke about clinical trials at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation’s fundraising breakfast, and had a great time doing it!

I was privileged to be able to share my story and to thank some of the people who help make a difference for cancer patients, their families, friends and broader communities through clinical trial funding.

This was an extremely well-organized event, with loads of people working hard both upfront and behind the scenes.

I don’t know the exact numbers, but there were about 50 tables of 8, each with a table host and an “expert” (e.g. oncologist, cancer coach, etc.). Our table expert was a cancer fitness instructor, and I would have loved to have had more time to pick his brain! 🙂

I am very grateful for the many people who invested so much time and energy into making this event a success. There is a great commitment to excellent cancer care in the Ottawa region!

IMG_4040

Even with a crowd of 400 or so, I didn’t really feel nervous. I felt moments of nervousness, but I prayed and breathed and felt peaceful and calm. I felt like I was meant to be there and really excited for the opportunity! I give thanks to the Lord for this good gift of confidence and peace!

Just as the breakfast was about to start, one of the Cancer Foundation people asked me if I’d do an interview for a local radio station right then, so I ducked out and missed the opening few minutes of the breakfast. Again, I felt completely calm and glad to do it! I haven’t heard the story yet – don’t even know if it has aired.

The breakfast was so well organized that I knew well in advance exactly when it would be my turn to speak. They confirmed it with me again before the breakfast yesterday morning, but there was also someone who came to my table at the right time, to get me and practically escort me right onto the stage! No backing out! haha 🙂 Seriously, I felt very well-cared for by the team in the lead-up to the event, during it, and afterwards. Very encouraging!

The mayor served as MC, and did a great job! He helped me to relax in the moments before I spoke, while they showed a video much like the one which had been on the news last month. He quietly asked about my kids, where I live, people we know in common, etc. For a very brief moment I considered mentioning to him that the sidewalks on our street are in terrible shape and could really use his attention (I’ve been emailing our Councillor about that lately!), but instead I chose to focus on why we were there! 😉

My speech was only 5 minutes long. So much more I wish I could have said, but these are busy people who need to get to work. I honoured the 4 – 6 minute range they gave me.

I spoke about the strong community of support we have, and the generosity lavishly poured out on our family. I specifically mentioned the prayers, encouragement and the food!

I mentioned that the Lord has made a huge difference for me. Afterwards a woman I didn’t know approached and kept thanking me for speaking and saying, “Praise God!” I’m assuming she was a Christian: it was encouraging to hear from her and shake her hand!

It was good to connect with people who introduced themselves to me afterwards. It’s a small world, and I spoke with a few folks I knew or who knew who I was. I am so thankful for the two friends who came with me, and the team of dear people who weren’t there, but encouraged me and prayed for me. I carried this support with me, and felt carried by it.

Here’s an excerpt from my speech, the end bit:

Every day is a gift! I don’t know how many more I’ll have, but I want to make the most of each one.

I’m thankful that research continues to develop new and better treatments that I hope will help extend my life for many years. I want to celebrate many more birthdays with family and friends, and I’d love to see my kids grow up and even my grandchildren. Clinical trials are helping me to have hope!

Your generosity in supporting clinical trials is making a significant difference for cancer patients, their family, friends and communities. Thank you for standing with us, as members of our support team.

I dream that one day soon the treatment for cancer will be 3 months of a daily pill, and then you’re done. That’s a dream worth working towards, and we get to play a part in that!  Thank you for the part that you are playing.

(Where do you think I teared up? If you guessed when I mentioned my kids, you’d be right!)

The feedback I heard the most afterwards was that people were inspired, and that I spoke clearly and powerfully …

… but what really excites me is that the Foundation raised over $215,000 at the breakfast yesterday morning! What generosity! I hope it makes an even bigger difference!

I’m thankful that I could play my small part!

I count you all of you, dear readers, as members of our support team, and I thank you!

The Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation helps fund local clinical trials and offers cancer coaching to anyone who has been affected by cancer, including family members and friends.  http://www.ottawacancer.ca

If you’d like to donate to the Cancer Foundation, consider supporting my husband Jono’s fundraising efforts as he runs the marathon next week-end in support of the Foundation.  http://ottawacancer.kintera.org/ottawaraceweekend/jono   (No pressure!)

Now I’m off to run some errands and enjoy this beautiful Spring day!

IMG_3946.jpg

IMG_3965