True confession time

Lung Cancer is nasty. While I was working hard with all my advocacy and community building, trying to make my little part of the lung cancer world a little better, lung cancer snuck up on me and outsmarted the drug I was taking.

I really liked the targeted therapy drug I was taking, and I was disappointed it didn’t work longer for me. Some people get a lot longer than I did. I have to be honest, I was hoping for three years or even more. I got one year and eight months.

So at the end of the Summer when I was feeling tired, and when the kids were going back to school and I was exhausted. That was the cancer. I was coughing a bit and I kept telling myself it was because we were swimming in chlorinated pools, but it was the cancer.

I’m thankful for my oncologist, and the fact that he makes me have CT scans even though I don’t like them. I’m thankful that he keeps on top of latest developments, new drugs and how to gain access to them. That can be tricky for cancer patients.

I can’t tell you how thankful I am that there was another drug I could jump to. It’s called Lorlatinib, I’m getting it free from the pharmaceutical company, and so far it’s working well with limited side effects. What a great gift!

I’m feeling really well! I’m relieved and grateful.

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I’m beyond thankful for another extension on my life. That’s what these amazing drugs do for me. They let me live longer, give me the opportunity to be there for my kids, my husband, and all the other important people in my life.

That’s why research means so much. Every new drug developed gives me and other survivors like me the gift of life for a little longer… another few months or years to share with our friends and family, a chance to see our kids grow a little taller or perhaps even graduate.

My oldest son was 12 years old when I was diagnosed, and I’m so happy that I’m alive to see him reach grade 12! The past two Saturdays I got to tour local Universities with him, hang out with him and help him as he decides where to go and what to study next year. With this new drug, I’m really hopeful I’ll get to see him attend University!

I know many of you have given to Lung Cancer Research. Thank you. You are making a life and death difference for people like me, for families like mine, not to mention our friends and communities. You are giving the gift of life for a little longer, the gift of opportunity for moments and memories, a gift that is precious and treasured. Thank you.

Onwards to a cure!

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PS: November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month.

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4 thoughts on “True confession time

  1. Thanks again for sharing your journey. My dad is now in palliative care, a hospice in Cornwall with stage four – end stage lung cancer. Even now, each day is a gift and the time is precious. May God yet grant you many many more years, Jill. Your life is an inspiration. ❤️

    • Birgid, I’m so sorry. You are right about each moment being a precious gift. Please give your family my love. You’re always in my heart and we’re praying. Thank you for your prayers for me, for us. I love you, Birgid.

  2. Thanks for this, Jill. You say so eloquently what Terry feels. So glad you’ve had more time with your family. We feel the same. Our eldest grandaughter was 13 when Terry was diagnosed. All the could think about was her Poppa wouldn’t see her graduate. Well, he did and feels blessed to also see our youngest start Kindergarden this year. Thank God for all the developments in Lung Cancer treatments. Praying you get many more years with your family.

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